The Get Away Plan

“There’s too much going on right now.” “We don’t have time to stop and plan.” Perhaps, you’ve heard these expressions in the halls at your association. If you’re not careful, planning for the New Year is one of those exercises that will constantly fall off your ever growing list of things to do. It might be worth it to get away for a day to do nothing but plan.

In a post to the company’s blog, Richard D. Maher, president and CEO of Maher & Maher, a specialized change management and talent development consulting firm with offices in New Jersey and D.C., reflected on a recent trip he took to the Jersey Shore with his senior staff members. “We worked to identify growth opportunities as well as to address areas we want to improve as a Firm in 2016 and beyond,” he wrote.

Maher made specific reference to the “awesome views that complemented some serious discussions.” He also described taking the “the time to enjoy the amazing scenes outside our window and to reflect on the work we have ahead as we strive to make our firm the best it can be for customers and for ourselves.”

Clearly, Maher viewed his team’s surroundings as complementary to the planning process. Perhaps, there is something to be said for getting away from it all and focusing on planning for the future. Your association might make concerns similar to those that Maher highlighted central to your planning process:

In addition, I like that during the planning process, each senior staff member was asked to “to consider a time that made them proudest to be a part of the team and reflect on why.” Their responses and observations might not have ever been discussed during the course of the company’s day-to-day operations. It was important for them to get away and plan.